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Drawing Pretty Girls Day 16

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Drawing Pretty Girls, Pencil Drawings, Sketch Book

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These drawing studies I did from the Famous Artist Cartoon Course are various types of girls with the Round Head Shape. The labels “Bird Brain,” “Gold Digger,” and “Dowager” were actually written in under the illustrations the original lesson. Keep in mind this is a drawing course from the 1940s and is not politically correct.

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Drawing Pretty Girls Day 11

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Drawing Pretty Girls, Pencil Drawings, Sketch Book

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Read  Day 1 HereDay 2 HereDay 3 HereDay 4 HereDay 5 HereDay 6 HereDay 7 Here.

I did three more head studies of what is suppose to be the “average girl.” The Famous Artist Cartoon Course does not really give any specific description or explanation of what constitutes an average girl other than to keep your lines “angular and crisp.” I may redraw this set tomorrow as I’m not particularly happy with how they turned out.
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Drawing Pretty Girls Day 7

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Drawing Pretty Girls, Pencil Drawings

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Read  Day 1 Here, Day 2 Here, Day 3 Here, Day 4 Here

According to the Famous Artist Cartoon Course Lesson 7 “The most successful method for drawing appealing babes is to pencil in the compete figure in the desired pose before attempting to clothe it. Clothes won’t hide a poor drawing of the figure underneath them.”

Todays drawing is a free hand recreation of Joe King’s illustration of a girl in a bikini signaling the reader or student to turn to the next page.

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Drawing Pretty Girls Day 5

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Drawing Pretty Girls, Pencil Drawings, Uncategorized

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Read  Day 1 Here, Day 2 Here, Day 3 Here, Day 4 Here

Today we learn about the “Four essential parts to a sexy girl” according to the Famous Artist Cartoon Course Lesson 7. Below is the drawing I did from this lesson. It is a free hand recreation of the illustration by Joe King. Each one the four circles in the drawing are suppose to be one of the “four essential parts.” They are listed in the course as 1. The Face 2. The Breasts 3. The Hips and 4. The Legs.

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Drawing Pretty Girls Day 4

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Drawing Pretty Girls, Pencil Drawings, Personal Journal, Sketch Book

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Read  Day 1 HereDay 2 HereDay 3 HereDay 4 Here

Today is “The Cartoon Girl Based On Life.”

Todays lesson comes from Famous Artists Courses Lesson 7. This is to teach the artist the difference between drawing the “cartoon girl” and a “real girl.” In the first illustration I was suppose to draw a layin of the figure with the black area’s indicating the figure of the actualy model. It is an exercise in where to change your drawing from life to make an appealing cartoon girl. The second drawing is a fully finished cartoon girl based on the same pose. Both drawings I did are free had recreations of the drawing in the course by Joe King.

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Drawing Pretty Girls Day 3

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Drawing Pretty Girls, Pencil Drawings, Personal Journal, Sketch Book

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Read Drawing Pretty Girls Day 1 Here, Day 2 Here

To improve in my ability to draw women I am working through lesson 10 of the Famous Artist Cartoon Course circa the late 1940s “Drawing Pretty Girls.”

Still working through the second page of the lesson. There is a black and white photograph of a Nude Woman. For todays exericse I did a free hand pencils study of the of the photograph as close to the actual photo as I could.

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Drawing Pretty Girls Day 2

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Drawing Pretty Girls, Pencil Drawings, Sketch Book

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Read Drawing Pretty Girls Day 1 HereDay 2 HereDay 3 HereDay 4 Here

Moving onto to the next page of the course there are a total of 3 illustrations to make a study of in addition to about 1/4 a page of written text. Today I will do the first illustration.

The female figure, as the cartoonist draws it is a stylized figure based on the popular American ideal.

This is also more of a challenge as the idealized female figure for me doesn’t exactly meld with the American ideal. It is also difficult as I now have to draw the full figure.

Below is my second attempt at recreating the first figure drawing on this page of the lesson. Look and comparing the two illustrations (mine and Joe King’s) I made mine quite a bit thicker than Joe’s even though I was striving for the super slender figure and his over all pose looks a lot more dynamic than mine.Pretty_Girl_Day_2

Drawing Pretty Girls Day 1

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Drawing Pretty Girls, Pencil Drawings, Personal Journal

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One of my biggest weakness in Illustration is in drawing Women. There’s a lot of reasons for this. One major issue being when I was younger I was too embarrassed to draw women. I thought if I drew the female figure people would judge me as being a pervert. Today however as an adult I am not embarrassed and don’t care if people judge me. I have therefore decided to make a serious study to improve my abilities in this area. The famous saying goes; An artist that can draw beautiful women never goes hungry.

To get started on this endeavor I have decided to work through the classic Famous Artist Cartoon Course Lesson 7 Pretty Girls by commercial Cartoonist Joe King. The original famous artists correspondence courses were founded in the late 1940s by Norman Rockwell and  Albert Dorn. I believe the original course consisted of 10 lessons with an addtional 14 lessons add at a later time. Each lesson was then to be completed by the student and sent in for critique by a professional. Today the courses are still under copy right by Cortina Learning International and available for purchase at the famous artist school website here.

The first page of the course begins with a half page type written introduction to drawing “the pretty girl.”

Here are some of the funnier quotes;

The pretty girl, the dame, the frail, the tomato, the cookie, the cutie is always welcome in a cartoon no matter how grotesque the rest of the characters may be.

In drawing a pretty girl, don’t be too skimpy with the bust or the thigh line. These can be accentuated without giving the drawing any suggestion of vulgarity.

Probably the best piece of advice given in this first part of the lesson is;

One well-known cartoonist who always said he couldn’t draw sexy or pretty girls became on of the top girl artist in the business simply by drawing one complete figure from pencil to ink each day for one year.

Here is my drawing from this first page. It is a free hand pencil drawing recreation I did of the original inked illustration by Joe King.

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Little Nemo Illustration Part of the “110 Years In Slumberland”

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration

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This Windsor Mckay tribute illustration I did was accepted to be part of the “110 Years In Slumberland” show at the Pop Secret Art Gallery in Glendale California. The opening of the show is Today October 24th! Also in the show is work by Dan Riba (Director of the acclaimed Batman: Animated Series) and Dreamworks story artist Peter Paul. Also in the show will be some original animation cells from 1989s animated film Little Nemo: Anventures in Slumberland.

To learn more about Windsor Mckays Little Nemo you can check out and read all his original strips online for free on Comic Strip Libary here to really study Windsor McKays work there’s nothing better than holding a fullsized (the size the Nemo Strips were orginally printed) hard copy of McKays work in our hands. For this I highly recommend picking up a copy of Little Nemo in Slumberland: So Many Splended Sundays! to add to your personal library.

Rare Night Of The Living Dead Original Art Work

Posted by Sam Kressin in Comic Books, Drawing and Illustration, Personal Journal

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In the recent past I posted here about Fantaco’s 1991 comic book adaptation of the Night Of The Living Dead by Tom Skullan and Carlos Kastro. Kastro’s art in particular had a heavy influence on me. Posted here today is one of Kastro’s test pages for the series that had until today remained Unpublished. While at the San Diego Comic Con in 1993 I was able to buy this page off of Carlos for around $40. While I’ve sold most of the original art I purchased as a kid in order to raise money to take lessons in illustration and make my own comic books this is one of the few pieces I’ve held onto.

Tom Raney Batman Sketch Circa 1991

Posted by Sam Kressin in Comic Books, Drawing and Illustration, Pencil Drawings

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I got this Batman Sketch from comic book artist Tom Raney at the San Diego Comic Con Circa 1991.  Raney was an unknown artist at the time trying to break into comics. I thought this batman sketch was one of the most awesome kick ass depictions I’d ever scene of my favorite superhero. This sketch hung on my wall and sat next to my drawing board for years.

Today I look back on this sketch and it drives me crazy how batman’s bicep is drawn because a bicep does not tie into the deltoid like that. Batman’s abdominals and triceps are completely incorrect as well as the rest of the his anatomy. The head is too small in proprtion to the rest of Batman’s body. Yet even with all these errors it still looks cool. Perhaps some day I will ink this sketch myself and correct it.

Awesome Night Of The Living Dead Quick Sketches

Posted by Sam Kressin in Comic Books, Drawing and Illustration, Personal Journal

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I discovered this Night Of The Living Dead comic book adaptation at the San Diego Comic Con circa 1992. The book was illustrated by a French artist named Carlos Kastro who was attending the convention. I watched him do many sketches for fans he would seamlessly transitions between pencil, pen, ink, brush, white out and so on. He told me it doesn’t matter which tools you use (brushes, pens, paper ect) as long as you know what it does. This Kastro drew with everything. Here is the sketch he did inside my comic book with just white out. He literally used liquid paper white out that comes in a bottle with the cap that has a brush attached to it.

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Not long after watching Kastro draw quick sketches of skulls and zombies inside everyone’s comic books. I immediately took to practicing them myself drawing them upon every worksheet, piece of paper, note-book or homework assignment I was ever given during high school. Then one day in english class I drew a grouping of skulls on the top of a hand out near my name. The teacher saw the image of death laden upon my sheet of paper pointed to it and said; “I don’t like that kind of thing!” I knew I was on the right track.

The next year I returned to San Diego Comic Con and Carlos Kastro was back! He had the second issue with him. Here is the quick sketch he did for me inside my comic.

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Here are the covers to Night Of The Living Dead issues 1 & 2.night_of_the_living_dead_issue_1night_of_the_living_dead_issue_2

Back Board I Took Through Artists Alley San Diego Comic Con 1991

Posted by Sam Kressin in Comic Books, Drawing and Illustration

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Howard Simpson had never worked on the Simpson’s but he drew the Simpson’s on everything because they shared the same last name. Dan Barry drew the Indiana Jones he penciled a Dark Horse Series titled, “Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis.” The half circle and full circle with squiggly lines in the lower corner is Rob Liefield and that’s suppose to be Deadpool LOL. The Daredevil sketch is by Ron Garney he made it out to my Brother Seth who was with me and around ten years old at the time. Of course Sergio Aragones did a cool Groo Sketch and Stan Sakai did a cool Usagi Yojimbo.

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Greg Capullo’s Bane Re-Inked By Sam Kressin

Posted by Sam Kressin in Comic Books, Drawing and Illustration, My Inks over My Pencils

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A couple of months ago I attempted to ink an illustration of Bane by Greg Capullo. I choose to ink this drawing as a practice exercise to get better with my inking tools and because the illustration is done in a style I would never draw in. My in my first attempt posted here I inked Capullo’s pencils 100% with a brush and I took liberties to change just about what ever I wanted to or felt like changing. After showing it to my art teacher and mentor Joe Rubinstein he challenged me to re-ink it this time using a nib and trying to make it as faithful to the original pencils as possible. So here it is this is the best of my abilities at this point in time.

Frank Frazetta Recreation

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration, Pencil Drawings

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I finish this today pencils for a recreation I’m doing of a classic Frank Frazetta piece. I will being inking tomorrow. My proporations are not exactly the same as the original as I freehanded the entire piece (no tracing). This is an exersice to improve my skill to pay attention to Frazetta’s lines and feel how his drawing was put together.

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Greg Capullo’s Bane Inked By Sam Kressin

Posted by Sam Kressin in Comic Books, Drawing and Illustration, Inked Drawings

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I recently finished inking this Bane Penciled by Greg Capullo. I usually spend 25-30 minutes everyday inking over some else’s work I respect and admire. I do this as an exerices to improve my own skills in Drawing and in using my brush. This piece was 100% inked with a #3 Windsor Newton Series Seven Brush. Check out Greg’s original pencils below. Greg_Capullo_Bane_Pencils

If you are unfamilar with Capullo’s work I strongly recommend checking out;Batman: The Court of Owls this is a fantastic Batman Story with amazing visuals. I prefer the unwrapped edition because you can study Greg’s raw pencils. Aside from his acclaimed work on Batman He’s also known for having drawn the longest runs on Spawn which I believe spans over 70+ issues.

It’s also well worth listening to these fantastic Fatman on Batman interviews with Greg;

Earlier This Year Studying Walt Stanchfield Method of Gestural Drawing With David Pimental

Posted by Sam Kressin in Drawing and Illustration

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David Pimentel is a Story Artist at Walt Disney Feature Animation and a disciple of the late Walt Stanchfield.  David continues to pass on his knowledge and approach to Gestural Drawing through regular classes at the Center Stage Gallery in Burbank California.

Here are a few of my drawings from one of the sessions I did in Pimental’s class hover over the photo to click through to the next slide…